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Also here are her aunt Joyce Gutierrez and cousin Ava Aquino. At the same time, I’ve got to tell you that the full class from St. Lorne Given, a long-time friend and a member of my executive, and also a nephew of one of our long-time Conservative members here, Lorne Henderson. Peggy Sattler: I would like to welcome once again Cheryl Davies and Borden Craddock, who are the mother and grandmother of page Owen Davies from my riding of London West, and who have joined us today in the public gallery. Drug addiction services have an even longer waiting list. The outcome and the reality is the government’s not doing enough. Patrick Brown: The reality is, when you actually go and visit these centres—when I visited Ontario Shores, they said the cuts were too much. At the Royal last year, they had to cut 18 staff members who are needed on the front lines dealing with mental health in Ontario; 18 people were cut. They’re voting against lowering hospital parking fees. They’re voting against 170,000 more Ontario seniors getting zero deductible— The Speaker (Hon. And on top of making seniors pay more, the Liberals are planning to cut $200 million from the seniors’ drug benefit. Speaker, why is the minister trying to balance the budget on the backs of some of our most vulnerable students? Liz Sandals: I want to start out by assuring everyone that at the moment we are consulting on the future of the programs to make sure that we serve deaf children in Ontario and children with very severe learning needs in the best way possible. I’ve been visiting the demonstration schools, which deal with children with very severe learning disabilities. These are some of the most vulnerable kids in our province. This weekend we heard from Becca Haggit, a student who attends Amethyst and has benefited deeply from it.

I’d like to welcome to the members’ west galley Mr. She’s not quite in, but that was the end of introductions. Jeff is an activist around community energy solutions and community conservation, and a great citizen of Ontario. Patrick Brown: My question is for the Acting Premier. I would like to be able to provide all questioners and those giving answers with the appropriate attention that they deserve. The geriatric hospital wing at the Royal has a three-month waiting list. While I’m trying to speak and I’m standing, giving people instructions, the minute I sit down, I hear heckling. Number two, would the member please address the Chair. They’re voting against $178 million for affordable housing and homelessness initiatives. The Premier has given herself more than three weeks to figure out what everyone in Ontario already knows: that struggling seniors cannot afford to pay more for their medication. The closure of both schools leaves students in southwestern Ontario with nowhere else to turn. While we’re doing the consultation, we have put a pause on accepting enrolments because we need to figure out the best way to deliver the programs going forward. Speaker, back to the minister: Students who want to attend specialized schools like Robarts or Amethyst should have the right to do so. Thousands of parents have signed petitions online begging the minister and her government to keep these important schools open.

There are many, many things that we’re doing to transform our mental health services across the province, including at the Royal in Ottawa. Have the courage to ask for treatment,” and then they cut that treatment. Seniors have also seen wait-lists for long-term care get longer and longer. If the Acting Premier wants the list, I’ll give it to her. When will Ontario seniors get the respect that they deserve from this Liberal government? Deborah Matthews: Speaker, the NDP are saying that they are going to vote against $250 million more to home and community care. Minister, I have a document here that outlines an RFP issued by the LCBO on February 24, one day before the budget was released. There is a bigger group, and we need to think through our programs carefully. John Fraser: Ma question est pour le ministre des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts.

The Royal, as well, has benefitted from a substantial new investment in a dedicated CT scan that will benefit patients who are challenged by mental illness. The reality is, mental health is just as important as physical health, but this Premier and this government don’t recognize how cruel it is that they go out during Bell Let’s Talk month and say, “Come forward. They’re voting against $333 million to support kids with autism. However, today I’m asking specifically about the fact that seniors have seen their drug costs double. And now, the Premier is increasing their medication costs and slashing the Ontario drug benefit. We need to figure out how we help all the kids who are struggling to learn to read but have average intelligence.

As most people will know, certainly most people in northern Ontario will know, the forest industry really felt the downturn of the recession two or three years before the 2008 recession really took hold in the rest of the province.

As a result of that, our government came forward with a broad suite of programs, many of which are still in existence, valued at well over

As a result of that, our government came forward with a broad suite of programs, many of which are still in existence, valued at well over $1 billion, which continue to support, and have supported, the forestry industry in Ontario.

How much of that $200 million will be coming out of seniors’ pockets? Deborah Matthews: Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. It is a program which we continue to invest in, about $150 million a year, or a 3% increase in that budget on an annual basis.

Deborah Matthews: The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change. How did that work out with the people that he promised he would never introduce a carbon price tax, because the carbon tax doesn’t have a— The Speaker (Hon. On top of that, on page 180 of the budget, it says that the government is cutting $200 million from the Ontario drug benefit that helps seniors pay for their medication. Speaker, we’re proud of our drug program that provides nearly 5,000 different medications to Ontarians, including our seniors, but many others of low income that are deserving of those medicines.

Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by $1 billion, including $345 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen.

Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than $16 million to mental health services, in addition to $138 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students.

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As a result of that, our government came forward with a broad suite of programs, many of which are still in existence, valued at well over $1 billion, which continue to support, and have supported, the forestry industry in Ontario. How much of that $200 million will be coming out of seniors’ pockets? Deborah Matthews: Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. It is a program which we continue to invest in, about $150 million a year, or a 3% increase in that budget on an annual basis. Deborah Matthews: The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change. How did that work out with the people that he promised he would never introduce a carbon price tax, because the carbon tax doesn’t have a— The Speaker (Hon. On top of that, on page 180 of the budget, it says that the government is cutting $200 million from the Ontario drug benefit that helps seniors pay for their medication. Speaker, we’re proud of our drug program that provides nearly 5,000 different medications to Ontarians, including our seniors, but many others of low income that are deserving of those medicines. Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by $1 billion, including $345 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen. Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than $16 million to mental health services, in addition to $138 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students. “Premier,” the environment critic said, “will you heed the advice of the PC Party of Ontario and commit to not implementing a carbon tax? 1050 Let me say, our environment critic is a phenomenal MPP, and what she said last week was that we don’t need a cap-and-trade policy that’s simply another Liberal slush fund. That’s an important measure that’s going to benefit so many Ontarians. On top of nearly doubling what most seniors will pay, the Liberals are cutting $200 million from the seniors’ drug coverage. Deborah Matthews: The PC leader said on Saturday that there was practically universal support in the caucus for carbon pricing, but just last week, the environment critic said that it was PC policy not to support cap-and-trade. Patrick Brown: Again to the Acting Premier: Once again, I did not get an answer on revenue neutrality. We’ve made important changes and measures in this budget so that an additional 170,000 people will go from paying a $100 deductible to paying a zero-dollar deductible. Andrea Horwath: What the minister is not admitting to is that under the Liberals’ plan, more seniors will be paying more for their prescription drugs. I’m going to ask the two members of the family, the aunt and the brother, to stand—come on, stand right up. We have made a substantial new increase this year, and I would hope that the member opposite would recognize that it’s important for these hospitals in the context of the transformations that we’re undergoing. The funding is not enough when one in three hospitalizations is caused by mental illness. It should be no surprise to the Liberals that New Democrats actually believe in pharmacare and in more opportunity. So they’re voting against making the shingles vaccines free for eligible seniors. Victor Fedeli: Speaker, I can take from the fact that we didn’t get an answer about the 250 stores that they’re selling 250 stores across Ontario. It’s curious that the RFP went out before the budget was released, yet none of those details were in the budget: no details on which 250 locations, no details on how many thousands of jobs will be cut, no details on the financial impact this will have on the bottom line. The problem is, though, that we have thousands of kids in the province who need support with reading. The minister needs to listen to students who are directly impacted by these specialized programs. Patrick Catholic School are here today, and they will be in the gallery momentarily, and they’ll be here for the photo as well. I asked the staff and the physicians at the Royal what we could do, what we could raise at Queen’s Park, and they said, “Tell the government, and tell the Minister of Health to stop cutting our mental health facilities.” Will the government commit to supporting mental health in the province of Ontario? Deborah Matthews: To the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. Eric Hoskins: I’m hoping, based on that question, that the official opposition will support us in our budget, because, in fact, we are increasing our funding, not just generally in hospitals—an additional $345 million to hospitals—but specifically to our in-patient mental health hospitals across this province. There is not enough when mental illness affects one in three people during their lifetime. The question is, I appreciate you’ve got your talking points, but every mental health facility is cutting staff. These are things that New Democrats don’t support, Speaker. Will this government stop cutting and instead make medication more affordable for more seniors? Deborah Matthews: It seems to me that the only criticism the third party has of this budget is an item that the Premier has already said we’re going to take another look at. The demonstration schools have some wonderful programs. She is advocating for herself and for the rights of other children with unique needs who need to access these schools.LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DE L’ONTARIO Monday 7 March 2016 Lundi 7 mars 2016 Introduction of Visitors Oral Questions Mental health services Climate change Ontario Drug Benefit Program Ontario Drug Benefit Program Privatization of public assets Special-needs students Ontario budget Mental health services Mental health services Child and youth services Ring of Fire Domestic violence Ontario budget Public transit Food safety Decorum in chamber Introduction of Visitors Members’ Statements Pharmacists Animal protection Member’s newsletter James Gillies Camp Eagle Nest Western Mississauga Maple syrup Royal Ottawa Inspiration Awards GO Transit Petitions Family Responsibility Office Leamington ketchup Lung health Hospital funding Ontario Northland Transportation Commission Water fluoridation Long-term care Health care funding Caregivers Special-needs students Privatization of public assets Ontario Retirement Pension Plan Health care funding Orders of the Day Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act (Supporting Survivors and Challenging Sexual Violence and Harassment), 2016 / Loi de 2016 sur le Plan d’action contre la violence et le harcèlement sexuels (en soutien aux survivants et en opposition à la violence et au harcèlement sexuels) Climate Change Mitigation and Low-carbon Economy Act, 2016 / Loi de 2016 sur l’atténuation du changement climatique et une économie sobre en carbone The House met at 1030. The new NDP is just stuck on one issue that we’ve already said we will review. Section 3.2.1 states, “The LCBO’s main intention is to sell properties,” and 3.2.3 says the LCBO will consider leasing out properties that are deemed unsaleable or if they can generate high revenue from a tenant. Among them was continued support for your Ministry of Natural Resources. The NDP is saying they’re voting against free tuition for the kids in the lowest income—actually, income up to $50,000 a year. The old NDP would have been standing up and cheering this news. It states that the LCBO is seeking a real estate vendor to sell 250 LCBO store locations right across the province. Minister, the 2016-17 budget contained many positive measures to grow our economy for Ontarians.

billion, which continue to support, and have supported, the forestry industry in Ontario. How much of that 0 million will be coming out of seniors’ pockets? Deborah Matthews: Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. It is a program which we continue to invest in, about 0 million a year, or a 3% increase in that budget on an annual basis. Deborah Matthews: The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change. How did that work out with the people that he promised he would never introduce a carbon price tax, because the carbon tax doesn’t have a— The Speaker (Hon. On top of that, on page 180 of the budget, it says that the government is cutting 0 million from the Ontario drug benefit that helps seniors pay for their medication. Speaker, we’re proud of our drug program that provides nearly 5,000 different medications to Ontarians, including our seniors, but many others of low income that are deserving of those medicines. Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by

As a result of that, our government came forward with a broad suite of programs, many of which are still in existence, valued at well over $1 billion, which continue to support, and have supported, the forestry industry in Ontario.

How much of that $200 million will be coming out of seniors’ pockets? Deborah Matthews: Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. It is a program which we continue to invest in, about $150 million a year, or a 3% increase in that budget on an annual basis.

Deborah Matthews: The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change. How did that work out with the people that he promised he would never introduce a carbon price tax, because the carbon tax doesn’t have a— The Speaker (Hon. On top of that, on page 180 of the budget, it says that the government is cutting $200 million from the Ontario drug benefit that helps seniors pay for their medication. Speaker, we’re proud of our drug program that provides nearly 5,000 different medications to Ontarians, including our seniors, but many others of low income that are deserving of those medicines.

Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by $1 billion, including $345 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen.

Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than $16 million to mental health services, in addition to $138 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students.

||

As a result of that, our government came forward with a broad suite of programs, many of which are still in existence, valued at well over $1 billion, which continue to support, and have supported, the forestry industry in Ontario. How much of that $200 million will be coming out of seniors’ pockets? Deborah Matthews: Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. It is a program which we continue to invest in, about $150 million a year, or a 3% increase in that budget on an annual basis. Deborah Matthews: The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change. How did that work out with the people that he promised he would never introduce a carbon price tax, because the carbon tax doesn’t have a— The Speaker (Hon. On top of that, on page 180 of the budget, it says that the government is cutting $200 million from the Ontario drug benefit that helps seniors pay for their medication. Speaker, we’re proud of our drug program that provides nearly 5,000 different medications to Ontarians, including our seniors, but many others of low income that are deserving of those medicines. Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by $1 billion, including $345 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen. Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than $16 million to mental health services, in addition to $138 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students. “Premier,” the environment critic said, “will you heed the advice of the PC Party of Ontario and commit to not implementing a carbon tax? 1050 Let me say, our environment critic is a phenomenal MPP, and what she said last week was that we don’t need a cap-and-trade policy that’s simply another Liberal slush fund. That’s an important measure that’s going to benefit so many Ontarians. On top of nearly doubling what most seniors will pay, the Liberals are cutting $200 million from the seniors’ drug coverage. Deborah Matthews: The PC leader said on Saturday that there was practically universal support in the caucus for carbon pricing, but just last week, the environment critic said that it was PC policy not to support cap-and-trade. Patrick Brown: Again to the Acting Premier: Once again, I did not get an answer on revenue neutrality. We’ve made important changes and measures in this budget so that an additional 170,000 people will go from paying a $100 deductible to paying a zero-dollar deductible. Andrea Horwath: What the minister is not admitting to is that under the Liberals’ plan, more seniors will be paying more for their prescription drugs. I’m going to ask the two members of the family, the aunt and the brother, to stand—come on, stand right up. We have made a substantial new increase this year, and I would hope that the member opposite would recognize that it’s important for these hospitals in the context of the transformations that we’re undergoing. The funding is not enough when one in three hospitalizations is caused by mental illness. It should be no surprise to the Liberals that New Democrats actually believe in pharmacare and in more opportunity. So they’re voting against making the shingles vaccines free for eligible seniors. Victor Fedeli: Speaker, I can take from the fact that we didn’t get an answer about the 250 stores that they’re selling 250 stores across Ontario. It’s curious that the RFP went out before the budget was released, yet none of those details were in the budget: no details on which 250 locations, no details on how many thousands of jobs will be cut, no details on the financial impact this will have on the bottom line. The problem is, though, that we have thousands of kids in the province who need support with reading. The minister needs to listen to students who are directly impacted by these specialized programs. Patrick Catholic School are here today, and they will be in the gallery momentarily, and they’ll be here for the photo as well. I asked the staff and the physicians at the Royal what we could do, what we could raise at Queen’s Park, and they said, “Tell the government, and tell the Minister of Health to stop cutting our mental health facilities.” Will the government commit to supporting mental health in the province of Ontario? Deborah Matthews: To the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. Eric Hoskins: I’m hoping, based on that question, that the official opposition will support us in our budget, because, in fact, we are increasing our funding, not just generally in hospitals—an additional $345 million to hospitals—but specifically to our in-patient mental health hospitals across this province. There is not enough when mental illness affects one in three people during their lifetime. The question is, I appreciate you’ve got your talking points, but every mental health facility is cutting staff. These are things that New Democrats don’t support, Speaker. Will this government stop cutting and instead make medication more affordable for more seniors? Deborah Matthews: It seems to me that the only criticism the third party has of this budget is an item that the Premier has already said we’re going to take another look at. The demonstration schools have some wonderful programs. She is advocating for herself and for the rights of other children with unique needs who need to access these schools.LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DE L’ONTARIO Monday 7 March 2016 Lundi 7 mars 2016 Introduction of Visitors Oral Questions Mental health services Climate change Ontario Drug Benefit Program Ontario Drug Benefit Program Privatization of public assets Special-needs students Ontario budget Mental health services Mental health services Child and youth services Ring of Fire Domestic violence Ontario budget Public transit Food safety Decorum in chamber Introduction of Visitors Members’ Statements Pharmacists Animal protection Member’s newsletter James Gillies Camp Eagle Nest Western Mississauga Maple syrup Royal Ottawa Inspiration Awards GO Transit Petitions Family Responsibility Office Leamington ketchup Lung health Hospital funding Ontario Northland Transportation Commission Water fluoridation Long-term care Health care funding Caregivers Special-needs students Privatization of public assets Ontario Retirement Pension Plan Health care funding Orders of the Day Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act (Supporting Survivors and Challenging Sexual Violence and Harassment), 2016 / Loi de 2016 sur le Plan d’action contre la violence et le harcèlement sexuels (en soutien aux survivants et en opposition à la violence et au harcèlement sexuels) Climate Change Mitigation and Low-carbon Economy Act, 2016 / Loi de 2016 sur l’atténuation du changement climatique et une économie sobre en carbone The House met at 1030. The new NDP is just stuck on one issue that we’ve already said we will review. Section 3.2.1 states, “The LCBO’s main intention is to sell properties,” and 3.2.3 says the LCBO will consider leasing out properties that are deemed unsaleable or if they can generate high revenue from a tenant. Among them was continued support for your Ministry of Natural Resources. The NDP is saying they’re voting against free tuition for the kids in the lowest income—actually, income up to $50,000 a year. The old NDP would have been standing up and cheering this news. It states that the LCBO is seeking a real estate vendor to sell 250 LCBO store locations right across the province. Minister, the 2016-17 budget contained many positive measures to grow our economy for Ontarians.

billion, including 5 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen. Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than million to mental health services, in addition to 8 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students. “Premier,” the environment critic said, “will you heed the advice of the PC Party of Ontario and commit to not implementing a carbon tax? 1050 Let me say, our environment critic is a phenomenal MPP, and what she said last week was that we don’t need a cap-and-trade policy that’s simply another Liberal slush fund. That’s an important measure that’s going to benefit so many Ontarians. On top of nearly doubling what most seniors will pay, the Liberals are cutting 0 million from the seniors’ drug coverage. Deborah Matthews: The PC leader said on Saturday that there was practically universal support in the caucus for carbon pricing, but just last week, the environment critic said that it was PC policy not to support cap-and-trade. Patrick Brown: Again to the Acting Premier: Once again, I did not get an answer on revenue neutrality. We’ve made important changes and measures in this budget so that an additional 170,000 people will go from paying a 0 deductible to paying a zero-dollar deductible. Andrea Horwath: What the minister is not admitting to is that under the Liberals’ plan, more seniors will be paying more for their prescription drugs. I’m going to ask the two members of the family, the aunt and the brother, to stand—come on, stand right up. We have made a substantial new increase this year, and I would hope that the member opposite would recognize that it’s important for these hospitals in the context of the transformations that we’re undergoing. The funding is not enough when one in three hospitalizations is caused by mental illness. It should be no surprise to the Liberals that New Democrats actually believe in pharmacare and in more opportunity. So they’re voting against making the shingles vaccines free for eligible seniors. Victor Fedeli: Speaker, I can take from the fact that we didn’t get an answer about the 250 stores that they’re selling 250 stores across Ontario. It’s curious that the RFP went out before the budget was released, yet none of those details were in the budget: no details on which 250 locations, no details on how many thousands of jobs will be cut, no details on the financial impact this will have on the bottom line. The problem is, though, that we have thousands of kids in the province who need support with reading. The minister needs to listen to students who are directly impacted by these specialized programs. Patrick Catholic School are here today, and they will be in the gallery momentarily, and they’ll be here for the photo as well. I asked the staff and the physicians at the Royal what we could do, what we could raise at Queen’s Park, and they said, “Tell the government, and tell the Minister of Health to stop cutting our mental health facilities.” Will the government commit to supporting mental health in the province of Ontario? Deborah Matthews: To the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. Eric Hoskins: I’m hoping, based on that question, that the official opposition will support us in our budget, because, in fact, we are increasing our funding, not just generally in hospitals—an additional 5 million to hospitals—but specifically to our in-patient mental health hospitals across this province. There is not enough when mental illness affects one in three people during their lifetime. The question is, I appreciate you’ve got your talking points, but every mental health facility is cutting staff. These are things that New Democrats don’t support, Speaker. Will this government stop cutting and instead make medication more affordable for more seniors? Deborah Matthews: It seems to me that the only criticism the third party has of this budget is an item that the Premier has already said we’re going to take another look at. The demonstration schools have some wonderful programs. She is advocating for herself and for the rights of other children with unique needs who need to access these schools.LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DE L’ONTARIO Monday 7 March 2016 Lundi 7 mars 2016 Introduction of Visitors Oral Questions Mental health services Climate change Ontario Drug Benefit Program Ontario Drug Benefit Program Privatization of public assets Special-needs students Ontario budget Mental health services Mental health services Child and youth services Ring of Fire Domestic violence Ontario budget Public transit Food safety Decorum in chamber Introduction of Visitors Members’ Statements Pharmacists Animal protection Member’s newsletter James Gillies Camp Eagle Nest Western Mississauga Maple syrup Royal Ottawa Inspiration Awards GO Transit Petitions Family Responsibility Office Leamington ketchup Lung health Hospital funding Ontario Northland Transportation Commission Water fluoridation Long-term care Health care funding Caregivers Special-needs students Privatization of public assets Ontario Retirement Pension Plan Health care funding Orders of the Day Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act (Supporting Survivors and Challenging Sexual Violence and Harassment), 2016 / Loi de 2016 sur le Plan d’action contre la violence et le harcèlement sexuels (en soutien aux survivants et en opposition à la violence et au harcèlement sexuels) Climate Change Mitigation and Low-carbon Economy Act, 2016 / Loi de 2016 sur l’atténuation du changement climatique et une économie sobre en carbone The House met at 1030. The new NDP is just stuck on one issue that we’ve already said we will review. Section 3.2.1 states, “The LCBO’s main intention is to sell properties,” and 3.2.3 says the LCBO will consider leasing out properties that are deemed unsaleable or if they can generate high revenue from a tenant. Among them was continued support for your Ministry of Natural Resources. The NDP is saying they’re voting against free tuition for the kids in the lowest income—actually, income up to ,000 a year. The old NDP would have been standing up and cheering this news. It states that the LCBO is seeking a real estate vendor to sell 250 LCBO store locations right across the province. Minister, the 2016-17 budget contained many positive measures to grow our economy for Ontarians.

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